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Member States

Digital collections

Does your cultural heritage institution have a digital collection? How many objects of your total collection are recorded in a collection database, how many objects are digitally reproduced and how do you make your collection accessible for online visitors?

What does this page show?

The data presented on this page is collected via the ENUMERATE survey, a bi-annual survey which collects data from cultural heritage institutions across Europe. The goal of this survey is to create a reliable baseline of statistical data about digitisation, digital preservation and online access to cultural heritage in Europe. This page presents the data on digital collections: how many objects are catalogued or digitally reproduced, how are they accessible to online visitors and how do institutions with and without digital strategies compare on these topics?

Before you dive in, take a look at our user's guide on how to navigate the data visualisations in Power BI.

Cataloguing your collection

Percentage of the collection that is catalogued in a database

For the data in this graph we asked institutions which part of the total collection is catalogued in a collection database. The left graph presents the European average data and in the right graph the data is broken down into the different domains. We compared the data of institutions with and without a digital strategy.

Use the legend to select the member states you wish to see. You can also select a specific year.

Digital reproduction

Percentage of the collection that is already digitally reproduced

For the data in this graph we asked institutions which part of the total collection is digitally reproduced. The left graph shows the European average percentage of collections that are already digitally reproduced and in the right graph the data is broken down into the different domains. We compared the data of institutions with and without a digital strategy.

Use the legend to select the member states you wish to see. You can also select a specific year in which the ENUMERATE survey is conducted.

Online accessibility

Part of digital objects that are made accessible to online visitors

For the data in the following three graphs we asked institutions whether their digital collection is accessible to online visitors and if so, which platform do they use? In the next three graphs we present the data of three platforms: the institution’s website, a national aggregator and Europeana.

Website

The graphs on the left present the average percentage of digital objects made accessible via the institution’s website and compare the data over the different years (surveys).

The graphs on the right present the average percentage of digital objects made accessible via the institution’s website and compare the data of institutions with and without a digital strategy.

Use the legend to select the member states you wish to see. You can also select a specific year.

National aggregator

The graphs on the left present the average percentage of digital objects made accessible via a national aggregator and compare the data over the different years (surveys).

The graphs on the right present the average percentage of digital objects made accessible via a national aggregator and compare the data of institutions with and without a digital strategy.

Use the legend to select the member states you wish to see. You can also select a specific year.

Europeana

The graphs on the left present the average European percentage of digital objects made accessible via Europeana and compare the data over the different years (surveys).

The graphs on the right present the average percentage of digital objects made accessible via Europeana of a specific member state.

Use the legend to select the member states you wish to see. You can also select a specific year.

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